This massive database is a wonderful resource for genealogists, and is available in many online locations for free search. What sort of details are kept? More information about the Social Security Death Index, Searching the Social Security Death Index [8] A more recent version was made available May 31, 2013. If a death hasn't been reported to the SSA, it won't be in the Social Security death records even if the individual had a social security number. Death Files, 1936-2007: Similar to the online SSDIs, but with fewer entries. United States Social Security Death Index, Social Security Administration's Freedom of Information Act Request Methods and Fees, Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007, Social Security NUMIDENT Files, 1936-2007, Social Security Death Index - Frequently Asked Questions, United States Railroad Retirement Board Records, U.S. Railroad Retirement Board Pension Claims - Index of the Inactive Claim Folders (deceased workers). About U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 The Death Master File (DMF) from the Social Security Administration (SSA) currently contains over 94 million records. What period is covered by these records? For information to be archived in the SSDI, a death needs to have been reported, or, for example, a surviving relative may have contacted the Social Security Administration (SSA) seeking to stop the Social Security Benefits (SSB) of a parent. Most persons who have died since 1936 who had a Social Security Number(SSN) and whose death has been reported to the Social Security Administration are listed in the SSDI. It is also useful for medical research such as clinical trials and epidemiology, because where survival data is missing from medical records (for reasons such as loss to follow-up), the SSDI can be used to backfill it. For most years since 1973, the SSDI includes 93 percent to 96 percent of deaths of individuals aged 65 or older. Claim Files, 1936-2007 (partial): These contain brief information about when a person made a claim for Social Security benefits, including death claims. On some of these sites, you can request copies of the application for SSDI records.

What is the Social Security Death Index? Are you ready to find your ancestors and build your family tree in the social security death index? Application (SS-5) Files, 1936-2007: These are abbreviated text versions with information extracted from the form the person filled out when they applied for a Social Security Card (SS-5 form).

Unlike the Death Master File, the SSDI is available free from several genealogy websites. A SSDI Search Tip: Start your search on the SSDI with just a few facts.

Some information on an actual SS-5, such as address and employer, is not included. What is it? A last name and known possible birth period may do for starters?

It was in the early 1960’s that the SSA commenced using computer technology to store and archive vital records. On December 18, 2011, Ancestry.com, changed access to the SSDI by moving the SSDI search behind a paywall, and stopped displaying the Social Security information of people who had died within the past 10 years.

Use first and last names only. [1][2] For most years since 1973, the SSDI includes 93 percent to 96 percent of deaths of individuals aged 65 or older. This story also noted that people in this situation can be highly vulnerable to identity theft because of the release of their Social Security numbers. In March 2012, the entire Death Master File, edition of November 30, 2011, was made available for download. It is frequently updated; the version of June 22, 2011, … [citation needed] In fact, the related Death Master File is used to prevent fraud so that no one can steal the identity of a dead person, and take out a credit card or a bank loan in a dead person's name. This resulted in an approximately 33% drop in reported deaths.[6].

Also see Ancestry's applications and claims index listed above. [7] However, other sites still provide free access.

Most of the birth dates recorded are from the early decades of the last century: 1900 to 1930 Death dates are mainly from the period 1962 to 1988. These people have sometimes faced difficulties in convincing government agencies that they are actually alive; a 2008 story in the Nashville area focused on a woman who was incorrectly flagged as dead in the Social Security computers in 2000 and has had difficulties, such as having health insurance canceled and electronically filed tax returns rejected.

How do I access the SSDI? If the results are very large, then add additional data and search again. [5], In November 2011, due to privacy and identity theft concerns, the Social Security Administration redacted and no longer included death data derived from State sources. Once a deceased person is found in the database, the person's application for Social Security card (Form SS-5) can be ordered from the Social Security Administration. Most persons who have died since 1936 who had a Social Security Number (SSN) and whose death has been reported to the Social Security Administration are listed in the SSDI. In fact, it contains more than 94 million names and details about birth, death, and last residence. The SSDI can assist your geneology research by providing data that will help you locate birth certificates and death certificates.

Given the growing problem of identity theft and the importance of the Social Security number as a personal identifier in the United States, it might seem unusual that these identifiers are released publicly. By providing the names of parents, a female’s maiden name, people’s places of residence and their occupation, it may also assist in the search for marriage certificates and other vital records. The SS-5 may contain additional genealogical data, such as birthplace, father's name, and mother's full maiden name or that information may be blacked out.

A review by the Government Accountability Office in 2013 found that the Social Security Administration and other federal benefit-paying agencies that use data from the Death Master File are potentially vulnerable to making improper payments due to errors or processes that could lead to errors. A SSDI Search Tip: Use maiden names when searching for females. However, because the documents held by the Social Security Administration are government records, it is required to make the information public under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The Social Security Death Index (SSDI) is a database of people whose deaths were reported to the Social Security Administration (SSA) beginning about 1962.

[3] It is frequently updated; the version of June 22, 2011, contained 89,835,920 records.[4]. Updates are also available by a subscription service.

Containing around 94 million names and vital information of mainly deceased Americans, the SSDI is an extremely large and important data base, especially for geneology enthusiasts. Containing around 94 million names and vital information of mainly deceased Americans, the SSDI is an extremely large and important data base, especially for geneology enthusiasts. You can access the SSDI through several websites, many of which are associated with the LDS Church. This facility allows you to search on any combination of data. Social Security Death Records (SSDR) contain the following data on a deceased person: A Search Tip: When doing a search in the SSDI, do not include the middle initial. What sort of details are kept? A recent government audit revealed that the Social Security Administration had incorrectly listed 23,000 people as dead in a two-year period. Some of their originally free information is now available via paid subscription only. A small number of deaths are listed before 1962.

Most of the text-based SS-5 forms in this database should give the names of the individual's parents and place and date of birth.

The Social Security Death Index, commonly referred to as the SSDI, is a database containing the names and dates of birth and death for over 77 million Americans. The Social Security Death Index (SSDI) is a database of death records created from the United States Social Security Administration's Death Master File Extract. What is it?

Provided by the Unites States Social Security Administration, the SSDI can help you find Social Security Death Records, which contain information on anyone whose death has been reported to the U.S. Social Security Administration. The SSDI is a popular tool for genealogists and biographers because it contains valuable genealogical data.